13 Self Care Ideas That Actually Heal Your Mind and Soul.

Psychotherapist, Brain Health Expert, and faculty at The Addictions Academy, Teralyn Sell, Ph.D. is featured in this article in Women’s Day 13 Self Care Ideas That Actually Heal Your Mind and Soul. You can join Dr. Teralyn at the Brain Health Recovery Coach class to learn how to support the health of your client’s brain during the addiction recovery process.  Dr. Teralyn also works with individual clients on brain health.

The words self-care are flung around like an easy concept similar to get better sleep or stress management.  But, we are often left wondering what is self-care anyway?  Often mental health providers provide a vision of self-care to their clients that is commercialized or unattainable.  Who has time, or money to get weekly massages anyway?

To take things a step further, in this time of COVID-19 the traditional, more commercialized ideas of self-care have become difficult to schedule or halted altogether.  Rethinking the definition of what it means to provided self-care has become a challenge when the commercialization of what we think it means is no longer available the way it once was.  But, if we stick to the price tags of massages, pedicures, and hair we leave out the vast majority of the population as well as virtually alienate men in the discussion.

So, what is self-care then?  In this news feature, Dr. Teralyn discusses the importance of defining self-care in terms that are not commercialized or expensive.  Head over to read about this important discussion. Read more.

10 tips to get the most out of virtual workout classes.

Psychotherapist, Brain Health Expert, and faculty at The Addictions Academy, Teralyn Sell, Ph.D. is featured in this article in MSN about how you can get the most out of your online exercise class this year During COVID-19. You can join Dr. Teralyn at the Brain Health Recovery Coach class to learn how to support the health of your client’s brain during the addiction recovery process.  Dr. Teralyn also works with individual clients on brain health.

As the pandemic lumbers on we are finding ourselves trying to get more creative about our exercise routines.  This is particularly true because the rates of anxiety and depression continue to increase posing the next mental health pandemic.  Exercise is a great way to get those feel-good chemicals flowing to combat stress and mental health problems.

Perhaps you don’t want to go to the gym or there might not be a gym near you to go to.  However, the exercise industry has stepped up and created tons of opportunities for virtual live classes. Though these classes aren’t exactly the same as when you would go in person, they are striving to be energetic and collaborative with group members.

If you want to step into the virtual world of exercise it is important to create a space within your home that is for this reason.  It doesn’t have to be a room, it could just be a corner.  Also, make sure that you mentally prepare yourself and put it on your calendar like a business appointment.  Dr. Teralyn discusses the importance of exercise and virtual opportunities for exercise in this MSN article. Read more.

Eating Excess Sugar Is Worse for You During COVID-19.

Psychotherapist, Brain Health Expert, and faculty at The Addictions Academy, Teralyn Sell, Ph.D. is featured in this article in Healthline about how Eating Excess Sugar Is Worse for You During COVID-19. You can join Dr. Teralyn at the Brain Health Recovery Coach class to learn how to support the health of your client’s brain during the addiction recovery process.  Dr. Teralyn also works with individual clients on brain health.

Sugar is largely one of the most addictive substances on the planet.  The amount of sugar consumed in a day, let alone in a year is alarming.  Sugar consumption leads to an array of health-related issues including, but not limited to, diabetes, obesity, and heart disease.  But, most people don’t realize that sugar is also implicated in mental health issues as well.  Not only does the amount of sugar you consume have a relationship with whether or not you will experience a mood disorder, but it also exacerbates pre-existing mental health issues.

In a pandemic such as COVID-19, we have been isolated from our friends, family, and even work life.  Stress is at an all-time high. What we know is that we like to reach for things that bring us comfort and unfortunately, sugar is one of those things.  As highlighted in the article:

  • During stressful times, sugar can bring comfort.
  • Sugar affects neurotransmitters in the brain.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that people with underlying health conditions, including metabolic syndrome, are at increased risk for complications from COVID-19.

What should you do about sugar consumption? Read more.

Seasonal Affective Disorder Might Be the Absolute Worst This Year.

Psychotherapist, Brain Health Expert, and faculty at The Addictions Academy, Teralyn Sell, Ph.D. is featured in this article in Yahoo Life about how seasonal affective disorder will be at an all-time high this year During COVID-19. You can join Dr. Teralyn at the Brain Health Recovery Coach class to learn how to support the health of your client’s brain during the addiction recovery process.  Dr. Teralyn also works with individual clients on brain health.

Many people have heard of seasonal affective disorder, but don’t really realize the profound impact it might have on your emotional health.  The seasonal affective disorder is a constellation of emotional symptoms that occur during seasonal changes.  Typically the season that is most prominently recognized as a SAD season is fall to winter.

You might experience low energy, problems sleeping, fatigue, depression, sadness, irritability, and more.  SAD may indicate a disruption in brain health particularly serotonin-related issues.  It could also indicate a vitamin D or other nutrient cofactor deficiency.  Brain health is an important piece to SAD recovery and can be helped in a number of different ways.  Nutrition, brain health, and exercise are Dr. Teralyn’s top ways to fight SAD.  She continues to discuss ways to combat SAD in the remainder of the article. Read more.

TV Shows Are Giving Us A Bigger Dose Of Our 2020 Reality

Psychotherapist, Brain Health Expert, and faculty at The Addictions Academy, Teralyn Sell, Ph.D. is featured in this article in HuffPost about how watching television shows can impact your emotional health During COVID-19. You can join Dr. Teralyn at the Brain Health Recovery Coach class to learn how to support the health of your client’s brain during the addiction recovery process.  Dr. Teralyn also works with individual clients on brain health.

As we search to find entertainment at home, television producers have begun to create shows that are unfolding the crisis of the pandemic almost in real-time.  So much so that we are left to wonder if it is healthy to continuously re-live the stress and trauma around the pandemic almost daily while watching television.

What we know is that many people across the globe have been struggling emotionally with the constant loss, grief, and even trauma that the pandemic has created.  But, it is important to understand how the replaying of this trauma can impact mental health on a more substantial scale.

For the most part, television shows can provide a much-needed escape from reality.  You sit down in front of another ‘person’s’ life and can momentarily wash away your own troubles of the day.  However, something has changed within Hollywood and now we are peering in on our own lives, in a surreal sort of way which could lead to a re-traumatization of what is really happening or even a sense of hypervigilance repeating our own traumas. Read more.